The Definitive Thelonious Monk On Prestige and Riverside

Thelonious Monk

The Definitive Thelonious Monk On Prestige and Riv
  • CAT # RIV-32324-25

    DISC ONE  
    1. Bye-Ya 2:48
    2. We See 5:17
    3. Blue Monk 7:35
    4. I Want To Be Happy 7:39
    5. Bemsha Swing 9:30
    6. Caravan 5:56
    7. Tea For Two 5:54
    8. Pannonica 8:52
    9. Brilliant Corners 7:47
    10. ’Round Midnight 6:44
    DISC TWO  
    1. Well, You Needn't 11:23
    2. Off Minor (Take 5) 5:10
    3. Epistrophy (Alternate Take) 3:09
    4. Trinkle, Tinkle 6:42
    5. Rhythm-a-ning 5:17
    6. Evidence 8:48
    7. Nutty 5:20
    8. Little Rootie Tootie 8:56
    9. Straight, No Chaser 9:23
    10. Ruby, My Dear 4:01
    11. Four In One 8:41

The Definitive Thelonious Monk on Prestige and Riverside covers a broad span of the '50s, beginning with trio sessions in New York featuring bassist Gary Mapp and drummer Art Blakey in October 1952 and stretching to sextet dates in San Francisco with trumpeter Joe Gordon, tenor saxophonists Harold Land and Charlie Rouse, bassist John Ore and drummer Billy Higgins in April 1960.

"This is some of the most amazing Thelonious Monk on record," says Nick Phillips, Concord Music Group's Vice President of Jazz and Catalog A&R and the producer of the Definitive series. "Whether he's playing a standard or one of his own compositions, he sounds uniquely like Thelonious Monk and nobody else. All of the tunes in this collection that Monk wrote have become jazz standards. Conversely, he plays standard tunes like `Caravan' and `Tea for Two' with such distinctive genius that you'd swear he had written them himself."

But Monk was no overnight sensation. He made "a long, slow climb from underground to mainstream adulation, and the ten-year period represented by this collection captures that ascent," says veteran music journalist Ashley Kahn in his liner notes. "The one constant -- creatively, promotionally, and economically -- was his recordings. First for Prestige Records from 1952 to '54, then for the Riverside label from '55 to '61, Monk was afforded the chance to create new music and work with a number of significant jazz peers in a number of contexts -- from solo piano, to trios, to quartets, even a big band . . . Most importantly, what Monk composed and recorded during the '50s amount to the definitive versions of some of the most enduring, joyous melodies in modern jazz."

Find out more about Thelonious Monk

MORE RELEASES FROM THELONIOUS MONK

Concord Music Group is launching five new titles in its Very Best Of jazz series, which showcases some of the very best tracks culled from the… More
Among the other aspects of his genius, Thelonious Monk was a brilliant solo pianist, as he proved on two classic unaccompanied recitals for… More
Today Thelonious Monk stands as an individual, a highly original musician who is the mentor of many young musicians in New York and the influence… More
Orrin Keepnews' commentary (from his new liner notes): "This, you might say, is an album of undiluted Monk." More
Orrin Keepnews' commentary (from the new liner notes): “This album was actually one of the major factors in the successful battle to win new… More
The quartet has always seemed to be Thelonious’s favorite musical format—it is the context he has worked in most often during his long… More
This previously unreleased live album features Thelonious Monk on piano, Charlie Rose groovin' the alto sax, Steve Swallow, playin' bass, and Ben… More
Remastered in 24-bit from the original master tapes. Part of our Keepnews Collection, which spotlights classic albums originally produced by the… More
Ironically, in 1964, the year that Riverside 's doors closed, Thelonious Monk appeared on the cover of Time magazine. By then, he was… More
Monk's Music is among the most significant of Thelonious's classic Riverside albums. Here he was literally looking back and ahead at the same… More
with Art Blakey, Kenny Clarke, John Coltrane, Ray Copeland, Frank Foster, Gigi Gryce, Coleman Hawkins, Gerry Mulligan, Oscar Pettiford, Curly… More
Because a relatively small number of his breakthrough recordings—33 selections, including alternate takes, as leader and sideman, in just… More