The Freedom Book

Booker Ervin

The Freedom Book
  • CAT # OJCCD-845-2

    1. A Lunar Tune 7:43
    2. Cry Me Not 4:48
    3. Grant's Stand 7:56
    4. A Day To Mourn 9:28
    5. Al's In 9:46

Booker Ervin's recordings with Charles Mingus and Randy Weston brought him good reviews and a bit of notoriety. But it was his series of Song Books for Prestige Records that broadcast the stentorian announcement that a jazz orator of gigantic stature had arrived. Ervin's tenor saxophone sound was haunted by the loneliness and spaciousness of the Texas plains where he was raised. The Southwest moan was an integral part of his playing. But his style went beyond the classic Texas tenor tradition to incorporate the intricacies of bebop and suggestions of the free jazz that was initiating one of the periods of self-renewal that keeps jazz fresh and interesting. The Freedom Book, recorded at the end of 1963, was one of Ervin's masterpieces. He is abetted by the power and drive of Jaki Byard, Richard Davis, and Alan Dawson.

with Jaki Byard, Richard Davis, Alan Dawson

Find out more about Booker Ervin

RECENT RELATED RELEASE

Three simmering dates from the mid-Sixties are the basis of the Don Patterson, Booker Ervin entry in Prestige's ambitious Legends of Acid Jazz… More

MORE RELEASES FROM BOOKER ERVIN

Booker Ervin's recordings with Charles Mingus and Randy Weston brought him good reviews and a bit of notoriety. But it was his series of Song… More
Booker Ervin was one of the great Texas tenor saxophonists, with the breadth of tone and conception common to the breed. His collaborations with… More
This music was taped at the beginning of the 1965 Munich, Germany session that also produced the Ervin/Dexter Gordon encounter Setting the… More
Intensity marked everything that Booker Ervin played. In his harmonic concept, slashing attack, and broad Texas sound, Ervin demanded attention… More
Like the greatest tenor saxophonist of his (or perhaps any) generation, John Coltrane, to whom he bore little true stylistic resemblance, Booker… More
Booker Ervin, Jaki Byard, Richard Davis, and Alan Dawson formed one of the immortal tenor-and-rhythm units of the Sixties, a group worthy of… More
Tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin's reputation was solidified in the mid-Sixties with the series of "book" albums he released on… More
The tenor saxophonist Booker Ervin first received national notice in a Charles Mingus group of the late 1950s. He came into his own during the… More
Of Booker Ervin's nine Prestige albums, this one is special because it presents him exclusively in the contexts of standard songs. Ervin's… More