Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis

The-Eddie-Lockjaw-Davis-Cookbook-Vol-1-LP-OJC-652

The Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis Cookbook, Vol. 1

  • Release Date: 01 Apr 2014
  • OJC-652

This is the classic jazz album by legendary saxophonist Eddie Lockjaw Davis that he famously recorded in 1958 for the Prestige label featuring organist Shirley Scott and flautist Jerome Richardson. The album was so successful two later cookbooks were also recorded by Davis. Newly reissued on vinyl, volume one is a MUST HAVE addition to all jazz collections.

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ABOUT EDDIE "LOCKJAW" DAVIS

Eddie

 

Possessor of a cutting and immediately identifiable tough tenor tone, Eddie "Lockjaw" Davis could hold his own in a saxophone battle with anyone. Early on, he picked up experience playing with the bands of Cootie Williams (1942-1944), Lucky Millinder, Andy Kirk (1945-1946), and Louis Armstrong. He began heading his own groups from 1946 and Davis' earliest recordings as a leader tended to be explosive R&B affairs with plenty of screaming from his horn; he matched wits successfully with Fats Navarro on one session. Davis was with Count Basie's Orchestra on several occasional (including 1952-1953, 1957, and 1964-1973) and teamed up with Shirley Scott's trio during 1955-1960. During 1960-1962, he collaborated in some exciting performances and recordings with Johnny Griffin, a fellow tenor who was just as combative as Davis. After temporarily retiring to become a booking agent (1963-1964), Davis rejoined Basie. In his later years, Lockjaw often recorded with Harry "Sweets" Edison and he remained a busy soloist up until his death. Through the decades, he recorded as a leader for many labels, including Savoy, Apollo, Roost, King, Roulette, Prestige/Jazzland/Moodsville, RCA, Storyville, MPS, Black & Blue, Spotlite, SteepleChase, Pablo, Muse, and Enja. ~Scott Yanow, All Music Guide